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ART KNOWLEDGES NEWS | 01/13/2008 | York City: Russian-born artist Boris Lurie, 83, died in Manhattan due to kidney failure, reported The New York Times. He survived the Holocaust and portrayed the horrors of it in a confrontational movement he called NO!art.
Lurie, born in 1924, was incarcerated at the age of 17 and transported to various ghettos, labor camps and Nazi concentration camps including Riga, Lenta, Stutthof and Buchenwald. After being liberated from Buchenwald in April of 1945, Lurie emigrated to the United States. A decade later he became co-founder of New York City's March Group, also known as the NO!art Collective. Lurie's works have been called a powerful and troubling indictment of man's injustice to fellow man.
Mr. Lurie, the last survivor of the three artists who started out at the March Gallery, left no immediate survivors. He continued to make art through the 1970s and 1980s but took part in only a handful of shows during those decades, all overseas.
In 1993 the Clayton Gallery on the Lower East Side organized the first American show in 29 years to display Mr. Lurie’s work. In subsequent years his work appeared in several shows in the United States, Latvia and Germany, including one in 1998 at the opening of the Buchenwald Museum, Ms. Stein said.
His work is included in permanent collections at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the National Gallery of Art in Washington.
Source: <http://www.artknowledgenews.com/Boris_Lurie_dies_at_83.html>

CURRY FAVOR | 1/12/2008 | Kansas City: Obituary by Colin Moynihan. - Boris Lurie, a Russian-born artist who survived the Holocaust and then depicted its horrors while leading a confrontational movement called NO!art, died Monday in Manhattan. He was 83.
The cause was kidney failure brought on by complications of a stroke, said Gertrude Stein, an art dealer and longtime friend.
Mr. Lurie was born in Leningrad in 1924 but soon after moved with his family to Latvia. During World War II he was imprisoned in a succession of concentration camps, absorbing graphic images that would resurface decades later in etchings, paintings and collages.
After moving to New York in the mid-1940s, Mr. Lurie settled on the Lower East Side and began painting. In 1959, along with Sam Goodman and Stanley Fisher, he formed a group that began exhibiting at the March Gallery.
Their work, which appeared in displays with names like the Doom Show and the Vulgar Show, was intentionally jarring and provocative. Mr. Lurie and the others aimed to provide an unvarnished representation of the violence and alienation that they felt mirrored the bleak reality of the nuclear age.
A 1962 etching by Mr. Lurie, for instance, combined a swastika and a Star of David. A 1959 work, “Railroad Collage,” superimposed an image of a partly dressed woman over another image of corpses stacked on a flatbed rail car.
“We are not playful!” Mr. Lurie wrote in a statement for a show in Milan in 1962. “We want to build art and not destroy it, but we say exactly what we mean — at the expense of good manners.”
Members of the March Group, as these artists came to be called, considered their creations to be life-affirming rather than nihilistic. They wrote that they were reacting to “the hallowed sickness of a world preparing to die” and called their work “Art for Survival.”
The artists gave a name to their movement, NO!art, the following year, when they staged a show at the Gallery Gertrude Stein in Manhattan. That work was meant to be a rebellion against Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art as well as a protest against dehumanizing influences like fascism, racism and imperialism.
“They were saying no to a world that was saying yes, buy more spend more,” said Ms. Stein, the gallery owner. “It was retaliation against the consumerism of the post-Second World War boom.”
Dietmar Kirves, a German artist who maintains a Web site about the history of the movement (no-art.info), said that Mr. Lurie was “a fighter against the hypocritical intelligentsia, capitalist culture manipulation, consumerism and other molochs.”
Mr. Lurie, the last survivor of the three artists who started out at the March Gallery, left no immediate survivors. He continued to make art through the 1970s and 1980s but took part in only a handful of shows during those decades, all overseas.
In 1993 the Clayton Gallery on the Lower East Side organized the first American show in 29 years to display Mr. Lurie’s work.
In subsequent years his work appeared in several shows in the United States, Latvia and Germany, including one in 1998 at the opening of the Buchenwald Museum, Ms. Stein said.
His work is included in permanent collections at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the National Gallery of Art in Washington.
Source: <http://tocurryfavor.blogspot.com/2008/01/boris-lurie-leader-of-no-art-dies-at-83.html>

WOMEN'S LENS | 1/13/2008 | New York: Russian-born artist Boris Lurie, 83, died in Manhattan due to kidney failure, reported The New York Times. He survived the Holocaust and portrayed the horrors of it in a confrontational movement he called NO!art.
Lurie, born in 1924, was incarcerated at the age of 17 and transported to various ghettos, labor camps and Nazi concentration camps including Riga, Lenta, Stutthoh and Buchenwald. After being liberated from Buchenwald in April of 1945, Lurie emigrated to the United States. A decade later he became co-founder of New York City's March Group, also known as the NO!art Collective. Lurie's works have been called a powerful and troubling indictment of man's injustice to fellow man.
Posted by Aimée Kligman, née Dassa at 1/13/2008 11:55:00 AM
Source: <http://womenslens.blogspot.com/2008/01/boris-luries-no-art.html>

EARTH TIMES | New York/Berlin: Anti-pop-art artist, Holocaust survivor Lurie dead. The New Yorker art rebel and Holocaust survivor Boris Lurie died after a long, difficult illness, the Berlin publicist Matthias Reichelt said Tuesday. Lurie, who was 83, died on Monday.
Born in Leningrad in the former Soviet Union, Lurie was an artist and author who survived several different concentration camps run by Nazi Germany during World War II.
He moved to New York in 1946, where he and several artist friends founded the Anti-Pop-Art movement NO!art in 1959 which saw art as a motivator of social action.
For most of his life he dealt aggressively with the themes of war and the Jewish genocide. His most famous - as well as most controversial - workis the "Railroad Collage" of 1959 - a photo collage of a stripper disrobing on a flatbed rail car piled high with corpses from the gas ovens.
"The aesthetic was to process everything that burdens you," he said.
Lurie was seized by the Nazis at age 16 with his father and was moved from one concentration camp to another, ending in Buchenwald. His mother, sister and grandmother were murdered by the Nazis.
In the '60s and '70s, Lurie aimed his NO!art movement against the prevailing art direction of abstract expressionism and Andy Warhol's pop art.
Together with Stanley Fisher and Sam Goodman, Lurie advocated using art to come to grips with the themes of real life. For them, that included war and violence, oppression and colonialism, racism and sexism.
Lurie last exhibited in Germany in the 1990s. In 1995, there was a two-part exhibit at the Neuen Gesellschaft fuer Bildende Kunst (New Society for Fine Arts) in Berlin. His work was also shown at the memorial museum at Buchenwald concentration camp from December 1998 to May 1999.
A film about his life, "Shoah and the Pin-Ups," ran in German movie theatres in 2006 and was also shown in abbreviated form on German television.
While Lurie protested capitalist investments in the art market, his pieces are included in permanent collections of the National Gallery of Art in Washington DC and the Museum of Modern Art in New York.
Source: http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/show/171001.html
Same obituary in:
EXPATICA.COM
Source: http://www.expatica.com/de/news/local_news/Artist-and-Holocaust-survivor-Lurie-dead.html
MAIL & GUARDIAN online, Johannesburg, January 22, 2008
http://www.mg.co.za/article/2008-01-22-antipopart-artist-boris-lurie-dies
TREND NEWS, Aserbaidschan
Source: http://news.trend.az/index.shtml?show=news&newsid=1107770&lang=EN

Google Groups | Newsgroups: alt.obituaries | From: "Hyfler/Rosner" | Date: Wed, 9 Jan 2008 09:17:08 -0500 | Subject: Boris Lurie; founder of the NO!art movement
LURIE, Boris. A founder of the NO!art movement, died January 7, 2008 after having suffered a massive stroke over a year earlier. He was born July 18, 1924 in Leningrad and taken to Latvia as an infant. At the age of sixteen, he, along with his father, was put into a concentration camp. Most of his family was murdered during the war. Upon his liberation by the Soviets, he assisted the American occupation forces and then emigrated to the U.S. Here, he became a painter, writer and poet. He remained the Zionist he'd been since childhood and his experiences during World War II only strengthened his radical politics. His art reflected a distaste for the easy consumerism of the post-war boom, the advertising which prodded it, and its effect on American art and culture. His multiple exhibitions culminated in one at the inaugural of the Buchenwald Museum.
Source:
http://groups.google.ie/group/alt.obituaries/browse_thread/thread/f4d82fa110764e34#75880e18d46dbfeb

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