NO!art + ABOUT US + ARTISTS + MANIPULATION + MAIL EN | DE
Boris Lurie >>> MEMO PREV  NEXT  INDEX
Boris Lurie exhibition search & find

OPTIMISTIC | DISEASE | FACILITY
BORIS LURIE: NEW YORK — BUCHENWALD
Curated by Matthias Reichelt
Haus am Kleistpark | Grunewaldstr. 6-7 | 10823Berlin | May 7 to June 20, 2004
Invitationcard +++ Press release +++ Views +++ Video
 

invitationcard
invitationcard
invitationcard
invitationcard
INVITATIONCARD, 4 pages, folded, 21 x 10 cm

+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +

PRESS RELEASE:

With this conceptually very clearly structured exhibition by the artist Naomi Tereza Salmon, who was born in Israel in 1965 and has lived in Germany for many years, the Haus am Kleistpark continues in two ways its now already traditional engagement with the memory of the expulsion and systematic murder of the European Jews. Naomi Tereza Salmon belongs to the young generation of artists who deal with the history and memory of the Holocaust in their very own way. Free of pathos but with a strong emotional expression, Salmon focuses in this exhibition on the work and life of Boris Lurie, a survivor who in turn makes his experiences the subject of visual art and poetics in an unprecedented way. Nine years ago, the Haus am Kleistpark, in cooperation with the NGBK, presented the visual work of Boris Lurie, while in the NGBK rooms in Kreuzberg the works of the NO!art movement, which he founded, were on display. Lurie's oeuvre, which is still relatively unknown in this country, is a unique testimony to uncompromising political thematization; it made a lasting impression on many visitors in 1995 and disturbed them in its radicalism: "Bis zur Schmerzgrenze" ("Up to the pain barrier") was the headline of the Tip at the time.

The current exhibition now brings together two artists whose biographies and works could hardly be more different. Boris Lurie, born in Leningrad in 1924 and raised in Riga, survived both the Riga Ghetto and several concentration camps with his father, while his mother, a sister and grandmother were murdered in the course of the "great actions" on November 29 and December 8, 1941, near the pine forests in Rumbula. Boris and Ilya Lurie experienced the liberation by the Americans in Magdeburg, in a subcamp of the Buchenwald concentration camp. After the war, both moved to the USA, where Boris Lurie has since lived in New York City and founded the radical art movement NO!art as a counter-movement to Pop Art in the late 1950s. He made his memories as a survivor the subject of his work and placed them in a current everyday context of advertising, pornography and politics. With a hard and contrasting aesthetic that does not harmonize, but rather lets contradictions collide in a polarizing way, he collages atrocity photos with pin-ups, combines them with other materials to create assemblages, and then paints over them as well.

The current exhibition now brings together two artists whose biographies and works could hardly be more different. Boris Lurie, born in Leningrad in 1924 and raised in Riga, survived both the Riga Ghetto and several concentration camps with his father, while his mother, a sister and grandmother were murdered in the course of the "great actions" on November 29 and December 8, 1941, near the pine forests in Rumbula. Boris and Ilya Lurie experienced the liberation by the Americans in Magdeburg, in a subcamp of the Buchenwald concentration camp. After the war, both moved to the USA, where Boris Lurie has since lived in New York City and founded the radical art movement NO!art as a counter-movement to Pop Art in the late 1950s. He made his memories as a survivor the subject of his work and placed them in a current everyday context of advertising, pornography and politics. With a hard and contrasting aesthetic that does not harmonize, but rather lets contradictions collide in a polarizing way, he collages atrocity photos with pin-ups, combines them with other materials to create assemblages, and then paints over them as well.


The press release of the Buchenwald Memorial stated: "Boris Lurie's life and life's work form a radical, rugged, and at the same time poetic Gesamtkunstwerk. In New York, Lurie inhabits his collages, as it were, and, as if through a flimsy fabric, the camp experience shines through everything that surrounds him in terms of civilization. After a retrospective of his work at the art museum of the Buchenwald Memorial in 1998/99, he has allowed the (...) artist Naomi Tereza Salmon to comprehensively document his life and life's work artistically for the first time. The exhibition therefore stands both for an unusual proof of trust as well as for mutual artistic appreciation and a rare form of subtle collaboration..."

In her photographic works, Naomi Tereza Salmon has so far often questioned found objects to what extent the things themselves have an inherent memory and can be read by the viewer in the serial works. In the current exhibition, Salmon confronts her photographic "still lifes" from Lurie's collaged living world with Lurie's linguistic works in writing and sound. With expressive camera work, a poetic and very personal film portrait of Lurie was also created, which is at the same time an expression of the form of memory of a younger generation of artists.Lurie's images and collages can be accessed in this exhibition on two monitors:

 1. Website of NO!art, history of the artist group
compiled by Dietmar Kirves (NO!art headquarters east)

2. Overview on Lurie's pictorial work from the documentation
of the archive of the Buchenwald Memorial.

+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +

VIEWS:

outdoor announcementshow roomshow room
Buchenwald bookLurie's desktopLurie's typewriter
Lurier's televisionLurie's suitcasesinfo monitor
click on image to elarge

+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +

NAOMI T. SALMON: BORIS LURIE: New York - Buchenwald

Documentation | Weimar-New York | 2003 | 58 min

The life and work of Boris Lurie creates a radical, brusque, and at the same time a poetic cosmos. In New York where Lurie lives within his collages, the experience of the Nazi concentration camps seeps through everything. Apartment studio and laboratory all reflect a very personal artistic view of the past which surrounds him in the present.

After meeting the artist Naomi Tereza Salmon (who lives and works in Germany), at Buchenwald during the retrospective exhibition of his works in 1998/99, he gave her permission to document his apartment, studio and storage space. A dialogue developed, covering a range of issues, mainly about the past, about living in New York, about the Palestinian issue, including discussions on Stalin and capitalism.

The film is a result of this encounter, laconically trying to capture the authentic situation, and was made as a low budget project. Considering the fact that Lurie is the founder of the No!art movement, the making of the film is inspired by its manifest, which presents an opposition to american mass culture and to the commercalizing process of art, putting in question the scene of mainstream and pop art, creating a genuine ideological and fundamental aesthetic approach of its own.

The music, which was composed specifically for this purpose by the German music and internet performer Jan Brüggemeier (pingfm — internet radio broadcasting), serves as an adhesive as well as an interpretative component. An examination of the metaphysical space, focusing on the encounter between the two artists and the experiences of each of them with their immediate surrounding takes place. The film offers no answers but presents the questions which arise in it in a clear way for the viewer to reflect on them.

ABOUT NAOMI TEREZA SALMON: Born in 1965, in Jerusalem, Israel. She studied photography at the Hadassa College in Jerusalem. Her muse is the sensitive photography. Lives in Weimar (Germany). more

return to top  
line
© https://borislurie.no-art.info/shows/2004_berlin_kleistpark-optimistic-en.html